Why My Next Album Can’t Live up to the Past

Back in the studio working on my second piano album!

It’s official… I’ve begun working on my second piano album!  I plan to record most of it over the course of this summer, and I expect to release it in early spring of 2015—perhaps sooner or later depending on how many other projects I’m doing.  I’m hoping to make it longer than Airbornehopefully around 40 or 45 minutes.  As of right now, I’ve completed two compositions with another almost done, bringing me to around twenty minutes of music.

I was hoping to come home from college with enough material completed to record another album right away.  And I wanted to be more active on my blog throughout the past year, release singles, produce other artists, and play more gigs, but life happened… Continue reading “Why My Next Album Can’t Live up to the Past”

Why Piano Recording Is So Challenging

Piano miking
Previous piano session miking using a matched pair of small-diaphragm condensers

In my last post, I mentioned in passing that I wrote a new piano composition. Well, now I’m getting ready to take it to the studio.  It’s called “Equinox,” and it’s eight minutes long, in the key of Db (also modulating to Ab and Gb/Ebm), has lots of tempo changes, uses nearly the entire keyboard, and requires all three pedals (yes, even the middle one).  Recording it, to say the least, is going to be challenging.

While one might think it would be easy to record one acoustic instrument, personally, I find it much harder to do well.  It’s so much more exposed; you can’t hide your problems.  There’s no covering up bad edits or poor tone-quality by burying it among other tracks.  With this kind of recording, you hear it all––the good and the bad.

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I’m sure of what I hope for

When people ask me, “What do you want to do for a career?” and I tell them that I’m a music producer and composer, they always look at me like I don’t know what I’m talking about.  They always seem to be thinking “That’s nice, but don’t you want to eat?” and they often ask about my “backup plan.”  But the way I see it, if I don’t go all out, I’m definitely not going to make it.  I work as hard as I can and dare myself to fail harder.  If I had a backup plan, I would already be admitting my failure.  I know that God has called me to music as a career, and to not believe it will work out is to say that I don’t trust God.

Continue reading “I’m sure of what I hope for”